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Choosing The Right Bowling Instructor

If you want to take bowling lessons, finding the right coach is an important task. Choosing the right bowling instructor to help you with your game is very important.

There are many certified and/or experienced bowling instructors in most cities across the country. Finding one who understands how to adapt coaching to fit your style of play, your physical gifts, your age and skill level, and your athleticism, becomes the real challenge.

Selecting an instructor with whom you have difficulties working with can set you back from your intended road to progress. However, there are many coaches who have sufficient experience working with bowlers who match best to your needs. The trick is finding one.

Begin by inquiring with your local pro shop professional. In many cases, the pro shop staff has one or two experienced instructors available to help you schedule a lesson.

Local bowling periodicals are available at no cost and may be found at area bowling centers. In almost all cases, coaches will advertise their availability and provide contact information so you may discuss your particular needs. Some newspapers provide a directory of coaches so multiple options are available.

The first thing to do after compiling a prospective list of coach candidates it to contact each and interview them, either by phone or in person.

Don't be bashful to ask direct questions. Ask about coaching credentials, background in coaching, and about the various clinics, seminars, or private appointments history each coaching candidate may possess.


It helps to inquire if the coach has certifications such as USBC Bronze or Silver certifications. Bronze and Silver coaches have attended training seminars conducted by the USBC and are educated as to how they can best present their coaching knowledge to their students.

It must be stated that the best coaches nearby your area may not be USBC certified. Often times a former professional bowler has the skill and abilities to help someone improve their game.

There are successful coaches, perhaps among the very top coaches, who are not certified. However, remember that bowling is supposed to be fun so perhaps a “drill sergeant” coach might not be the best option?

If you spend a bit of time asking your teammates, friends, or bowling center personnel for names of recommended coaches, you likely will get enough options to begin the interviewing process.

Try to find someone with whom you feel comfortable communicating. If you are senior bowler, you might want to find a coach equally seasoned and who understands the flexibility issues seniors experience.

If you have other physical limitations, it is important to communicate these matters with your prospective coach before making the decision to hire their services.

Once you have made your choice, attend your first coaching session open minded and willing to work. Document what you learn and which tips are given to help you structure a new practice routine. Finding the right coach for you can make all the difference.