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Getting Your First Bowling 300 Game

Getting your first bowling 300 game is not a right of passage. A perfect game is a difficult feat because in addition to hitting the pocket twelve times in a game, you must carry each delivery.

Every good player who thinks they have deserved a 300 score because they have rolled games where they hit the pocket every shot is mistaken. There can be countless games where you strike perhaps 8-11 times per game even if you hit the pocket solidly every delivery. Getting your first bowling 300 game can be a long process and one which has no guarantees.

Today’s house conditions, which are considered to be the USBC Red pattern, use a great deal of oil in the center portion of the lanes and far less oil toward the edges which creates a condition where experienced and skilled players can line up and seldom miss the pocket. Through our bowlingball.com research with the USBC, we have found a proven statistic that a vast majority of players rolling their first perfect game are bowling on the Red pattern when they do so.

The ability to hit the pocket over and over again coupled with modern bowling ball technology, gives bowlers a huge opportunity to hit the pocket repeatedly and carry twelve times thereby recording a perfect game.

A good deal of skill is involved in rolling a perfect game and we should not take that lightly. Playing the lanes so the angle of entry into the pocket is sharp enough to generate good pin carry is one key component of strike success. Another is the ability to deliver the bowling ball at a consistent speed each frame.

If the lanes are transitioning and an adjustment is required to continue hitting the pocket solidly, the player must know how to make the adjustment and trust that it will work. There are times during a series of games that the lanes change and adjustments are certainly needed. It is at that time when a skilled player decides which type of adjustment is needed.

Making an alignment adjustment is one way of compensating for oil breakdown or carry down. Another adjustment option might be to change your release and either add revs or add skid length. You may elect to stay under the ball or spin the ball slightly more than normal as an adjustment of choice.

You may change speeds by which you deliver the ball or you may wish to change your loft length to introduce the ball into the lane surface at a different distance from the foul line than when you initially began bowling.


Of course, we do not want to forget making a bowling ball change to provide an alternative skid, hook, or roll pattern so you can continue hitting the pocket repeatedly. Knowing which ball is likely the best option is another decision the skilled players need to consider. Having the optional bowling balls nearby and ready for use is a factor in making a ball change decision.

It is clear that rolling a perfect game is not an easy task. The modern day bowler must be committed to making good decisions on the lanes when it comes to speed control, alignment adjustments, loft control, delivery changes, and finally when it is best to change bowling ball equipment.

Once you are in position to roll a perfect game, say after you have 6 or 7 straight strikes to open a game of bowling in competition, finishing the job is the next challenge. To finish the job, you must learn to control your nerves and make good shots under pressure.

Because of these challenges, it can be said again that getting your first bowling 300 game is not an automatic accomplishment. Once you get by the first perfect game, however, the next one may be just around the corner. Pay attention to the details when you are on the lanes and make one good shot at a time. No secrets here, just work and practice and trust in your decisions.

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